Have You, or Someone You Know, Contracted 
Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) from Vaccination? 

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Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) is a rare autoimmune disorder in which a person's own immune system mounts an inflammatory response and causes damage to his or her peripheral nerves. This can affect the sensory, motor and autonomic nerves. Symptoms often come on rapidly and can include sensory disturbances in the extremities (hands, arms, feet and legs), muscle weakness and loss of reflexes. In some cases, this muscle weakness can lead to paralysis. In rare circumstances, patients can experience difficulty breathing that leads to respiratory difficulties.
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Have You, 
or Someone You Know, Contracted 
Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) from Vaccination?

What is Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS)?

GBS is similar to Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP), which also affects the peripheral nerves, but is distinguished by the gradual onset of symptoms and chronic nature of CIDP.

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$1,405,466.39

26-year-old female who received the HPV vaccine, and within days, experienced the onset of GBS.

$700,000

32-year-old male who received the flu vaccine and within 2 weeks, was diagnosed with GBS.

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What compensation is available in the Vaccine Program?

Compensation that may be awarded for a vaccine-related injury includes:

1. Reasonable compensation for future medical care
2. Reimbursement for past expenses relating to vaccine injury 
3. Past and future lost earnings 
4. Up to $250,000 for pain and suffering and emotional distress
5. In the event of a vaccine related death, a death benefit of $250,000

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With over 25 years of practice in the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (NVICP), Conway Homer, P.C. is the most experienced NVICP law firm in America. If you believe you may have experienced TM following vaccination from a Flu Shot or any other vaccine, please get in touch for a free consultation.

Your company mission statement or your ultimate value.

Instead, legal fees are paid separately by the United States Court of Federal Claims at the end of your case.

We are a team of lawyers who are solely dedicated to representing those who have been injured by vaccines. We do not practice in any other area of law. We are determined to get our clients financially compensated in the NVICP.

Our clients pay no attorney fees.

Instead, legal fees are paid separately by the United States Court of Federal Claims at the end of your case.

We are a team of lawyers who are solely dedicated to representing those who have been injured by vaccines. We do not practice in any other area of law. We are determined to get our clients financially compensated in the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (NVICP).

Our team-oriented approach has resulted in hundreds of millions of dollars awarded to our clients. This successful advocacy in landmark cases has shaped the Vaccine Program, making it friendlier and more generous to individuals who suffer from vaccine injuries.

What Are Some Symptoms of GBS?

What Vaccines Can Cause Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS)?

Diphtheria, Tetanus, acellular Pertussis (“DTaP”) Vaccine

Human Papillomavirus (“HPV”) Vaccine

Hepatitis A (“Hep A”) Vaccine

Influenza (“Flu”) Vaccine

Hepatitis B (“Hep B”) Vaccine

Tetanus, Diphtheria, Acellular Pertussis (“Tdap”) Vaccine

Meningococcal Vaccine

Unusual 
Tiredness

Tingling "pins and needles" in hands and feet

Difficulty 
Breathing

Who is involved in processing a vaccine claim?

The United States Department of Health and Human Services administers the Vaccine Program. The United States Department of Justice represents the Department of Health and Human Services in defending all claims.

All claims are presided over by the Office of Special Masters, within the United States Court of Federal Claims. The Court has eight (8) special masters who specialize in vaccine injury claims. A special master is assigned to each case and determines the outcome of a claim in the event that it proceeds to a hearing.

1. Reasonable compensation for future medical care
2. Reimbursement for past expenses relating to vaccine injury 
3. Past and future lost earnings 
4. Up to $250,000 for pain and suffering and emotional distress 
5. In the event of a vaccine related death, a death benefit of $250,000

There are several variants of GBS, including acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP), the most common GBS variant in the US. Other variants include Miller Fischer Syndrome (MFS), acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), and acute motor sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN).

Although  Guillain-Barré syndrome  is rare, it does not discriminate amongst the individuals affected, affecting both sexes equally and occuring at any age.

What causes GBS?

While the cause remains unknown, the Genetics Home Reference cites that approximately 50% of cases have been reported to occur shortly after a viral or bacterial infection, and sometimes following infections as common as the flu or food poisoning. GBS has also been reported to occur after receiving the flu vaccination.

After initial clinical manifestations of the disease, symptoms can progress over hours or days, but typically peak within four weeks. Muscle weakness gradually increases during the initial phase, although patients generally see these symptoms peak around the two week mark.

During the secondary phase, signs and symptoms of Guillain-Barré syndrome tend to stabilize. For this reason, the second phase is typically referred to as the “plateau” stage.

In the third and final phase, known as the recovery phase, symptoms can improve. Some people with Guillain-Barré syndrome, however, never fully recover. Typical residual symptoms include excessive fatigue, sensory disturbances, muscle weakness, or muscle pain.

How is GBS diagnosed?

Guillain-Barré syndrome is a clinical diagnosis based on presentation of weakness and absent reflexes. However, physicians typically conduct testing to support a diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome, including:

  • Lumbar Puncture (used to measure cerebrospinal fluid)
  • Electromyography and Nerve Conduction Studies

How is GBS treated?

Because the early stages of GBS are largely unpredictable and symptoms can be severe, most newly diagnosed patients are hospitalized.

Treating GBS can involve the coordinated efforts of a neurologist, physiatrist, internist, family physician, physical therapist, occupational therapist, social worker, nurse, and psychologist or psychiatrist. Some patients may also require speech therapy depending on the extent of the disease’s effects.

Plasma exchange and high dose intravenous immune globulins often assist in shortening the course of GBS if administered in the early stages of the disease. The GBS/CIDP institute finds that over 90% of patients move into the rehabilitative phase within four weeks.

Living with GBS

Patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome not only suffer physical difficulties, but can suffer emotionally painful periods as well. Many patients find it difficult to adjust to sudden paralysis and dependence on others for activities that were previously performed with ease.

The recovery period for GBS may last anywhere from a few weeks to a few years. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke cites that 30% of those with Guillain-Barré Syndrome still have residual weakness after 3 years, and 3% may suffer a relapse of muscle weakness and tingling sensations years after the initial attack.

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